Mormon Answers: Questions About the Dead

Do those who die cease to exist? Do they become unconscious? Or do they continue on as spirits, still the same person with memories and knowledge? The following page, based on a document by Raymond Woodworth and used with his permission, addresses these inquiries in some depth. This is another page in the suite of Frequently Asked Questions About Latter-day Saint Beliefs. (The views and opinions expressed here are the responsibility of Jeff Lindsay, a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. This page has not been endorsed by the Church.)

Question: Doesn't the Bible teach that the dead are unconscious as if they were asleep?

"For the living know that they shall die: but the dead know not any thing, neither have they any more a reward; for the memory of them is forgotten. Also their love, and their hatred, and their envy, is now perished; neither have they any more a portion for ever in any thing that is done under the sun. . . . Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with thy might; for there is no work, nor device, nor knowledge, nor wisdom, in the grave, whither thou goest." (Ecclesiastes 9:5-6, 10 - emphasis added)

"His breath goeth forth, he returneth to his earth; in that very day his thoughts perish." (Psalms 146:4)

"The dead praise not the LORD, neither any that go down into silence." (Psalms 115:17, cf. 6:5)

"These things said he: and after that he saith unto them, Our friend Lazarus sleepeth; but I go, that I may awake him out of sleep. Then said his disciples, Lord, if he sleep, he shall do well. Howbeit Jesus spake of his death: but they thought that he had spoken of taking of rest in sleep. Then said Jesus unto them plainly, Lazarus is dead." (John 11:11-14, cf. 1 Thessealonians 4:13-17)

Answer: No. The Bible teaches that the conscious spirit continues to exist.

God creates one's body from the dust of the earth and places one's spirit within. As a result, each individual has a dual nature of body and spirit, which joined together constitutes a living soul. Upon physical death, the body and the spirit separate. The body returns to "the earth as it was", and the spirit returns unto "God who gave it" (Ecclesiastes 12:7). Although the body has no consciousness after death, the disembodied spirit continues to exist as a sentient being; retaining the ability to think, feel, and remember the knowledge acquired here in mortality.

Some argue that the verses quoted above contradict the belief that there is life after death. They say that the dead have neither knowledge, thoughts, nor emotions; and that they exist in an unconscious "sleep" state. But in spite of what some may say, there is no contradiction between these verses and a belief in the afterlife; for the very reason that the verses quoted above are concerning corpses, not disembodied spirits. Both are referred to as the "dead" in the Bible (e.g. Genesis 23:6 & Isaiah 14:9-10).

The Spirit Within

From an anonymous comment made on my Mormanity blog (Jan. 5 entry):

While the OT generally treats man as a whole (see nepesh -soul," often rendered simply as "self"), it also recognizes his essential dualism (A. B. Davidson, The Theology of the OT, P. 202). Flesh and spirit combine to form the "self," so that while man may be said to have a Ruah he is a nepesh (yet he is sometimes said to possess a nepesh, which departs from his body at death). The Ruah is contained with its bodily nidneh 'sheath' (Dan 7:15, Aramaic; cf. Zech 12; 1). At death the body returns to dust, but the immortal spirit returns to God who gave it (Gen 3:19; Eccl 12:7). In this regard ruah and nepesh, here meaning distinctly "soul," tend to overlap (Job 7:11 Isa 26:9; cf. Ex 6:9 with Num 21:4; RTWB, P. 234). This differs from liberal theology, which tends to limit ruah to an impersonal vital power that becomes individualized only in the nepesh. Thus it claims that the soul cannot exist independently of the body, i.e. that when the ruah or ,-Power" departs (Eccl 12:7), the person ceases. to exist (L. Kdhler, Old Testament Theology, p. 145, opposed by Davidson, op. cit., pp. 200-201). Yet both nepesh and ruah may leave the body at death and exist in a state separate from it'(Gen 35:K Ps 86:13; cf. I Kgs 17:22 on the rare case of a soul's return to its body).

". . . there is a spirit in man: and the inspiration of the Almighty giveth them understanding." (Job 32:8)

The spirit is the life of the body; for without it, the body is dead (James 2:26). But it is more than just a life force. It is that part of a person which "knoweth" the things of that person:

"For what man knoweth the things of a man, save the spirit of man which is in him? even so the things of God knoweth no man, but the Spirit of God." (1 Corinthians 2:11)

To know anything requires thought and intelligence. This accords with other verses in the Bible, which reveal that the spirit within a person also manifests both emotion and awareness:

"I Daniel was grieved in my spirit in the midst of my body, and the visions of my head troubled me." (Daniel 7:15)

"Watch and pray, that ye enter not into temptation: the spirit indeed is willing, but the flesh is weak." (Matthew 26:41)

"And immediately when Jesus perceived in his spirit that they so reasoned within themselves, he said unto them, Why reason ye these things in your hearts?" (Mark 2:8)

"And Mary said, My soul doth magnify the Lord, And my spirit hath rejoiced in God my Saviour." (Luke 1:46-47)

"The Spirit itself beareth witness with our spirit, that we are the children of God:" (Romans 8:16)

"Do ye think that the scripture saith in vain, The spirit that dwelleth in us lusteth to envy?" (James 4:5)

Home in the Body

God creates one's body from the dust of the earth and places or forms one's spirit within (Genesis 2:7, 3:19; Job 32:8, Zechariah 12:1). As a result, the body serves as a physical structure, like a tabernacle or a house, in which one's spirit dwells:

"Yea, I think it meet, as long as I am in this tabernacle, to stir you up by putting you in remembrance; Knowing that shortly I must put off this my tabernacle, even as our Lord Jesus Christ hath shewed me." (2 Peter 1:13-14)

"For we know that if our earthly house of this tabernacle were dissolved, we have a building of God, an house not made with hands, eternal in the heavens. For in this we groan, earnestly desiring to be clothed upon with our house which is from heaven: If so be that being clothed we shall not be found naked. For we that are in this tabernacle do groan, being burdened: not for that we would be unclothed, but clothed upon, that mortality might be swallowed up of life. . . . Therefore we are always confident, knowing that, whilst we are at home in the body, we are absent from the Lord:" (2 Corinthians 5:1-4, 6; cp. Job 4:19)

Note how the apostles wrote the preceding verses from the point of view of their spirits which dwell inside their earthly bodies; spirits that "think", "know", and "groan". It stands to reason that, since the body is a physical structure in which an individual dwells, one's true self must be the spirit within. Thus, each person has a dual nature of body and spirit. The body is the "outward man" and the spirit is the "inward man" (2 Corinthians 4:16, Romans 7:22); and the union of the two constitutes a living "soul" (Genesis 2:7, cp. Job 32:8, Zechariah 12:1).

Physical Death

Physical death is the separation of one's body and spirit:

"Then shall the dust return to the earth as it was: and the spirit shall return unto God who gave it." (Ecclesiastes 12:7, cp. James 2:26)

When a person's spirit and body separate; one's thoughts depart with the spirit; leaving behind a body in which all thoughts perish:

"His breath goeth forth, he returneth to his earth; in that very day his thoughts perish." (Psalms 146:4)

Note that the "he" in Psalms 146:4 must be referring to the body, because it is the body that "returneth" to the earth, not the spirit (cp. Genesis 3:19 & Ecclesiastes 12:7). Likewise, since it is the spirit that "knoweth the things of a man"; all of one's knowledge also perishes within the body after the spirit leaves. Consequently, the dead (i.e. corpses) know nothing and will eventually go to the grave:

"For the living know that they shall die: but the dead know not any thing, neither have they any more a reward; for the memory of them is forgotten. Also their love, and their hatred, and their envy, is now perished; neither have they any more a portion for ever in any thing that is done under the sun. . . . .Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with thy might; for there is no work, nor device, nor knowledge, nor wisdom, in the grave, whither thou goest." (Ecclesiastes 9:5-6,10 emphasis added)

Referring to these verses, Joseph Fielding Smith wrote, " . . . when death intervenes, the body is laid away in the grave peacefully and that it knows nothing as to the affairs of a busy world." (Answers To Gospel Questions, Vol. 4, p.183)

Non-LDS scholar Donald C. Fleming agrees: "the dead know nothing: the context (or one look at a corpse) makes the meaning obvious." (F. F. Bruce, The International Bible Commentary, p. 699).

In verse 10, the word "grave" is translated from the Hebrew word sheol, which has several meanings depending on the context in which it is used. It can be translated as "hades", "grave", "hell", "pit", or "world of the dead." Thus, the term can refer to the spirit world or part of it. But the context of Ecclesiastes 9:5-6, 10 is describing a different place; a place where there is "no work, nor device, nor knowledge, nor wisdom"; a place where "the dead know not any thing." What could be more descriptive of the "grave" or tomb in which a corpse is laid to rest? Moreover, since a corpse has no mental or emotional faculties, it cannot do anything, much less praise the LORD:

"The dead praise not the LORD, neither any that go down into silence." (Psalms 115:17, cp. 6:5)
Many other verses can also be understood in terms of a corpse. Examples: a corpse is buried (Genesis 23:15); a corpse returns to dust (Psalms 104:29); a corpse is laid in the grave (Psalms 49:14); a corpse is silent (Psalms 31:17); a corpse cannot perceive (Job 14:21); a corpse cannot hope (Isaiah 38:18); and a corpse "sleeps" (Job 14: 10, 12).

Death and Sleep

Because of the physical resemblance between one who has recently passed away and one who has fallen asleep, some cultures refer to death as "sleep". The ancient Jews were no different; even Jesus used this metaphor:

"These things said he: and after that he saith unto them, Our friend Lazarus sleepeth; but I go, that I may awake him out of sleep. Then said his disciples, Lord, if he sleep, he shall do well. Howbeit Jesus spake of his death: but they thought that he had spoken of taking of rest in sleep. Then said Jesus unto them plainly, Lazarus is dead." (John 11:11-14, cf. 1 Thessealonians 4:13-17)

A metaphor is a figure of speech use to suggest a likeness between two different objects, ideas, or states of being. So, even though death is not sleep, there are certain similarities. Nevertheless, the point to keep in mind is that this metaphor is not meant to be a comparison between the state of a disembodied spirit and sleep; but rather, it is meant to be a comparison between the state of a corpse and sleep.

Generally, when a person dies, the body lies down; the eyelids close; and both the heartbeat and the breathing stop. Similarly, when a person sleeps, the body lies down; the eyelids close; and both the heartbeat and the breathing are markedly slowed. Thus, the appearance of one who has fallen asleep resembles that of one who has recently passed away. As a person rests in a state of unconsciousness in sleep, so a corpse rests in a state of no consciousness in death (Ecclesiastes 9:5-6, 10; Psalms 146:4).

In the Bible, there are number of verses which show that this metaphor is used specifically to describe the state of a corpse. For instance, a corpse sleeps in the "dust" of the earth (Dan 12:2); a corpse sleeps and is "buried" (1 Kings 2:10, 11:43, 14:31, 15:8, 15:24); and a corpse sleeps and sees "corruption" (Acts 13:36). Even Matthew wrote that "bodies" sleep in the graves (Matthew 27:52).

On the other hand, this metaphor is never used to describe the state of a disembodied spirit; which neither sleeps in the "dust", nor is "buried", nor sees "corruption". Remember, the body returns to the dust of the earth, not the spirit (Genesis 3:19, Ecclesiastes 12:7). Even so, some still insist that the spirit is just a form of energy or life force to the body, as electricity is to a computer, having no consciousness apart from the body. But to their dismay, the Bible teaches otherwise.

Before leaving this subject, however, one should also consider one of the primary differences between death and sleep; specifically between the state of "no consciousness" and the state of "unconsciousness". As described above, a corpse rests in a state of "no consciousness" because no spirit dwells inside a dead body (James 2:26). Thus, a corpse has neither knowledge, thoughts, nor emotions. On the other hand, a person who is asleep rests in a state of "unconsciousness" because a spirit still dwells inside a sleeping body.

While asleep, one retains the knowledge acquired thus far in mortality and continues to have unconscious thoughts and feelings in dreams. A person can even solve mathematical problems or think of new ideas during this period of unconsciousness. In fact, some individuals have received revelation from God through dreams; showing that one can acquire new knowledge while asleep (e.g. Genesis 37:5-11, Daniel 2, and Matthew 1:18-25). These inspired dreams also show that a person can see and hear while asleep, not with one's physical eyes and ears, but with one's spirit. Therefore, since the spirit inside the body can see, hear, feel, think, and learn while one's body is asleep; shouldn't the same spirit outside the body be able to perform these same functions while one's body is dead?

Life After Death

1. We Fly Away:
"The days of our years are threescore years and ten; and if by reason of strength they be fourscore years, yet is their strength labour and sorrow; for it is soon cut off, and we fly away." (Psalms 90:10)

The "we" in Psalms 90:10 refers to our spirits, which dwell inside our physical bodies; the same "we", which Paul describes as groaning inside our earthly house, "earnestly desiring to be clothed upon with our house which is from heaven" ( 2 Corinthians 5:1-6). Upon physical death, our spirits separate from our earthly bodies and "we fly away" (cp. Ecclesiastes 12:7).

2. The King of Babylon's Death:

"Hell from beneath is moved for thee to meet thee at thy coming: it stirreth up the dead for thee, even all the chief ones of the earth; it hath raised up from their thrones all the kings of the nations. All they shall speak and say unto thee, Art thou also become weak as we? Art thou become like unto us? Thy pomp is brought down to the grave, and the noise of thy viols: the worm is spread under thee: and the worms cover thee." (Isaiah 14:9-11, cp. Ezekiel 32:18-32)

Since a corpse has no consciousness and can not speak, the "dead" in these verses must be referring to the disembodied spirits of the "chief ones of the earth"; who deride this once mighty, but ruthless tyrant of Babylon. In death, the Babylonian king had become like them. Their disembodied spirits were gathered in hell, as their bodies lied covered with worms in the grave.

3. The Rich Man and Lazarus:

"There was a certain rich man, which was clothed in purple and fine linen, and fared sumptuously every day: And there was a certain beggar named Lazarus, which was laid at his gate, full of sores, And desiring to be fed with the crumbs which fell from the rich man's table: moreover the dogs came and licked his sores. And it came to pass, that the beggar died, and was carried by the angels into Abraham's bosom: the rich man also died, and was buried; And in hell he lift up his eyes, being in torments, and seeth Abraham afar off, and Lazarus in his bosom. And he cried and said, Father Abraham, have mercy on me, and send Lazarus, that he may dip the tip of his finger in water, and cool my tongue; for I am tormented in this flame. But Abraham said, Son, remember that thou in thy lifetime receivedst thy good things, and likewise Lazarus evil things: but now he is comforted, and thou art tormented. And beside all this, between us and you there is a great gulf fixed: so that they which would pass from hence to you cannot; neither can they pass to us, that would come from thence. Then he said, I pray thee therefore, father, that thou wouldest send him to my father's house: For I have five brethren; that he may testify unto them, lest they also come into this place of torment. Abraham saith unto him, They have Moses and the prophets; let them hear them. And he said, Nay, father Abraham: but if one went unto them from the dead, they will repent. And he said unto him, If they hear not Moses and the prophets, neither will they be persuaded, though one rose from the dead." (Luke 16:19-31)

Unlike corpses, these verses show that disembodied spirits retain their mental and emotional faculties; allowing them to think, feel, and remember memories of their mortal existence. The parable of the Rich Man and Lazarus clearly illustrates that the dead (i.e. disembodied spirits) do continue to exist as sentient beings after death.

In spite of this vivid depiction of life after death, some claim that this doctrine is false; because a parable is simply a fictitious story used to teach certain principles, not a real event. Again, they base their argument on Ecclesiastes 9:5-6,10 and Psalms 146:4; which state explicitly that the "dead" know nothing and have neither thoughts nor feelings.

Their argument, however, is founded on a false premise: Ecclesiastes 9:5-6, 10 and Psalms 146:4 are concerning corpses, not disembodied spirits as in Luke 16:19-31. In fact, nowhere in the Bible does it teach that disembodied spirits do not have thoughts or feelings. Furthermore, even though they may be fictitious, all of Jesus' other parables are based on events that have or could have happened. Why would the parable of the Rich Man and Lazarus be any different? In deed, Jesus would never base any of his teachings on a false doctrine. To do so would be deceptive and confusing, which is contrary to his divine nature (1 Peter 2:22, 1 Corinthians 14:33). Therefore, Christ's depiction of life after death in the parable of the Rich Man and Lazarus must be true.

4. Christ's Promise to the Malefactor:

"And Jesus said unto him, Verily I say unto thee, To day shalt thou be with me in paradise" (Luke 23:43)

The same day Christ and the malefactor died, they were together as disembodied spirits in Paradise (Abraham's bosom).

5. Christ Preached the Gospel to the Dead:

"For Christ also hath once suffered for sins, the just for the unjust, that he might bring us to God, being put to death in the flesh, but quickened by the Spirit: By which also he went and preached unto the spirits in prison; Which sometime were disobedient, when once the longsuffering of God waited in the days of Noah, while the ark was a preparing, wherein few, that is, eight souls were saved by water." (1 Peter 3:18-20)
The fact that Christ went and preached unto these disembodied spirits indicates that they must have the ability to hear and understand. A few verses later in the same epistle, the apostle Peter refers back to this very event:
"For for this cause was the gospel preached also to them that are dead, that they might be judged according to men in the flesh, but live according to God in the spirit." (1 Peter 4:6)
6. Baptism for the Dead:

"Else what shall they do which are baptized for the dead, if the dead rise not at all? Why are they then baptized for the dead?" (1 Corinthians 15:29).
Because Paul cited this practice to support his argument for the resurrection, he as well as the Corinthians must have viewed baptism for the dead was a valid ordinance. Evidently, at least some ancient Christians baptized for the dead; which suggests that they believed the dead have the opportunity to hear the gospel, believe in Christ, and repent of their sins.

7. They Who Are Fallen Asleep in Christ Have Hope:

"For if the dead rise not, then is not Christ raised: And if Christ be not raised, your faith is vain; ye are yet in your sins. Then they also which are fallen asleep in Christ are perished. If in this life only we have hope in Christ, we are of all men most miserable." (1 Corinthians 15:16-19)
In the preceding verses, some interpret "perished" to mean "nonexistent"; so that, if Christ were not raised from the dead, then they who have fallen asleep in Him would be "nonexistent".

Notwithstanding, "perished" is translated from the Greek word apollumi, which can also be translated as "lost." Note how the same Greek word is used in other places in the Bible:

"What man of you, having an hundred sheep, if he lose (apollumi) one of them, doth not leave the ninety and nine in the wilderness, and go after that which is lost (apollumi), until he find it? And when he hath found it, he layeth it on his shoulders, rejoicing." (Luke 15:4-5)

"Either what woman having ten pieces of silver, if she lose (apollumi) one piece, doth not light a candle, and sweep the house, and seek diligently till she find it? And when she hath found it, she calleth her friends and her neighbours together, saying, Rejoice with me; for I have found the piece which I had lost (apollumi)." (Luke 15:8-9)

In both cases, the sheep and the piece of silver are "lost" (apollumi) for some period of time; but they are not "nonexistent" while they are lost. Likewise, if Christ were not raised from the dead, then they who are fallen asleep in Him would be "lost" (apollumi); but they would not be "nonexistent."

Furthermore, after mentioning them who are "fallen asleep in Christ", Paul wrote, "If in this life only we have hope in Christ, we are of all men most miserable" (1 Corinthians 15:19). In this context, Paul was not referring to the life after the resurrection; but rather, to the life between death and the resurrection of them who are "fallen asleep in Christ". In other words, this life is not the only life in which we have hope in Christ. In the afterlife, those of us who are fallen asleep in Christ have hope in Him as well; otherwise, "we are of all men most miserable".

8. The Spirits of Just Men:

"But ye are come unto mount Sion, and unto the city of the living God, the heavenly Jerusalem, and to an innumerable company of angels, To the general assembly and church of the firstborn, which are written in heaven, and to God the Judge of all, and to the spirits of just men made perfect, And to Jesus the mediator of the new covenant, and to the blood of sprinkling, that speaketh better things than that of Abel." (Hebrews 12:22-24)

Moses Appearing to Christ

Question: If you believe that Moses died, and believe that the spirit does not live on after death, then what was going on when Moses appeared to Christ in Matthew 17?

Regarding the expression "the spirits of just men made perfect," consider the following observations: First, the plural "spirits" reveals that these spirits do not merge together to become one "spirit", as life forces or energies might behave. Instead, they maintain their individuality after death. Second, the phrase "of just men" indicates that these spirits also retain their identities. Third, "made perfect" shows that these spirits can be perfected between death and the resurrection. And fourth, these spirits are named among other intelligent, sentient beings (i.e., angels, church of the firstborn, God, and Jesus).

9. Paul's Allusions:

The apostle Paul alluded that there is life after death:

"For I am in a strait betwixt two, having a desire to depart, and to be with Christ; which is far better: Nevertheless to abide in the flesh is more needful for you." (Philippians 1:23-24)

"We are confident, I say, and willing rather to be absent from the body, and to be present with the Lord." (2 Corinthians 5:8)

In addition, Paul also wrote of some experiences, which further support the doctrine that there is a spirit within each of us that can consciously exist out of the body:

"It is not expedient for me doubtless to glory. I will come to visions and revelations of the Lord. I knew a man in Christ above fourteen years ago, (whether in the body, I cannot tell; or whether out of the body, I cannot tell: God knoweth;) such an one caught up to the third heaven. And I knew such a man, (whether in the body, or out of the body, I cannot tell: God knoweth;) How that he was caught up into paradise, and heard unspeakable words, which it is not lawful for a man to utter." (2 Corinthians 12:1-4)

Now in this instance, it is irrelevant whether these visions and revelations were real or imaginary, because to imagine anything still requires thought processes. The point here is that Paul believed it is possible for a man in Christ to consciously experience visions and revelations (real or imaginary) and hear unspeakable words while "out of the body". Thus, if it were false doctrine that one can consciously exist "out of the body", Paul would have never considered that possibility.

The Soul

"Soul" is one of those words that has several meanings depending on the context in which it is used. One definition is the union of the body and the spirit (Gen 2:7, cp. Zech 12:1 and Job 32:8). Consequently, mortal souls have been subject to death ever since the fall of Adam:
"And they smote all the souls that were therein with the edge of the sword, utterly destroying them: there was not any left to breathe: and he burnt Hazor with fire." (Joshua 11:11)

However, in other contexts the same word can also refer specifically to the spirit itself. As stated before, the spirit is the life of the body and departs from it at death (Job 32:8; James 2:26; Ecclesiastes 12:7). In the following verses, "soul" is used in place of "spirit"; showing that the two words can be used interchangeably:

"And it came to pass, as her soul was in departing, (for she died) that she called his name Benoni: but his father called him Benjamin." (Gen 35:18)

"And he stretched himself upon the child three times, and cried unto the LORD, and said, O LORD my God, I pray thee, let this child's soul come into him again. And the LORD heard the voice of Elijah: and the soul of the child came into him again, and he revived." (1 Kings 17: 21-22; cf. Luke 8:49-56).

Thus, a soul as one's spirit continues to exist independently of the body after death. For this reason, it is possible to kill the body without killing the soul (Matthew 10:28). This also explains how one's soul can prosper, even though one's person as a whole may not (3 John 2). Again, the Bible clearly reveals that the soul is more than just a life force that animates the physical body. It is a spirit entity that consciously exists apart from the body after death:
"And when he had opened the fifth seal, I saw under the altar the souls of them that were slain for the word of God, and for the testimony which they held: And they cried with a loud voice, saying, How long, O Lord, holy and true, dost thou not judge and avenge our blood on them that dwell on the earth? And white robes were given unto every one of them; and it was said unto them, that they should rest yet for a little season, until their fellowservants also and their brethren, that should be killed as they were, should be fulfilled." (Revelation 6:9-11).

Conclusion

God creates one's body from the dust of the earth and places one's spirit within. Thus, each individual has a dual nature of body and spirit, which joined together constitutes a living soul. The spirit inside is that part which "knoweth" the things of a person. It thinks, perceives, desires, and feels. The body is a physical structure, like a house or a tabernacle, in which one's spirit dwells.

Physical death is the separation of one's body and spirit. The body returns to "the earth as it was"; and the spirit returns unto "God who gave it". When the spirit departs, it takes with it one's knowledge, thoughts and emotions; leaving behind a body in which all these attributes perish. Consequently, corpses have no consciousness and "sleep" in the dust of the earth. On the other hand, disembodied spirits continue to exist as sentient beings apart from the body; retaining the ability to think, feel, and remember the knowledge and memories acquired here in mortality. However, in spite of their differences, both corpses and disembodied spirits are referred to as the "dead."

"Soul" is a term that has more than one definition depending on the context in which the word is used. It can refer to the union of the body and spirit; in which case, a mortal soul can be killed. "Soul" can also refer specifically to the spirit itself. As such, one's soul will consciously exist apart from the body after physical death.

Other Resources

LDSFAQBack to the LDS FAQ Index

Adam, the Fall, and the Messiah: The LDS Perspective - a page by Jeff Lindsay explaining differences between LDS theology and other views on the Fall and Christ.

Introduction to the LDS Church

Early Christianity and Mormonism (archived) - Barry Bickmore's excellent site includes several articles on the Trinity and our relationship to God. (See the section titled "Cosmology.")

Jeff Lindsay's home page


Curator: Jeff Lindsay ,  Contact:
Created: March 24, 2001; Last Updated: Feb. 17, 2008
URL: "http://www.jefflindsay.com/thedead.html"