Corona Virus Asia Travel Tip for Flights: For a Better Trip, Skip Trip.com

One of the many things we’ve learned while being caught up in the difficulties of travel in Asia due to the Corona virus is just how unreliable and unhelpful some travel agencies are. One example is Trip.com (formerly CTrip). I’ve used them for years and have usually liked their service, but the total failure of their customer service now (unlike that of, say Delta Airlines) has made me resolve to avoid them for flights. They can seem to save money on many flights, but if you need help when an emergency arises like all the travel chaos from the Corona virus pandemic, Trip.com has been absolutely unreliable (speaking only of our experience, of course). They seem to have hired many new customer service reps to handle the high demand, but to me they seem to be not fully trained and even tell us that they are not authorized to make changes. All they do is take your request, forward some garbled version of your request to some mysterious “flight specialist” and tell you an email will come later. If something goes wrong, they won’t call and help you out. You will just get an email saying that your request was denied. Now you can start over!

They say that the request will come within one day, but it can be three or four days (as one agent explained to us and as we experienced), and then you may find, as we did, that they completely misunderstood your request or bungled it completely. Then you have to call again and start over, and by then it may be too late to get the flights you need. There is no sense of urgency in helping customers with urgent needs.

We have found that the information they give you is incorrect,┬á or that they charge high fees for flight changes that most airlines aren’t charging (I don’t know why they do this and will assume that it’s just a mistake or a glitch of third-party systems, but it to some it might create the impression of exploiting the crisis, which I don’t think is intentional).

In our latest case of several exasperating incidents with Trip.com, when we had to make flight changes due to cancelled flights, we bought a new ticket on Trip.com for my wife to get her back to China to teach when her international school opens its doors again in Shanghai in March. When we learned that the school had again delayed its opening date and also realized that the we needed to delay that flight due to escalating virus concerns, we called and found the agent was very unhelpful and could only pass on a request. They promised an email within 24 hours. It didn’t come.

We called twice more, and one agent said she was not authorized to make any changes. We called again and another agent seemed more helpful, but told us we would have to wait for an email. We explained we had already waited and it never came. Then he said he would “escalate” the request. We did get an email the next day, but it said that since we were changing the airport of departure (not true! everything was the same except the date), there was a large fee of about US$300. Completely wrong — it was the exact same itinerary, just a different date. Maybe the fee is correct and just the reason given was bungled? We’re not sure because all we have is just a confusing email.

After getting the email showing that Trip had completely bungled our request and wanted us to pay $300 to make a change in dates on a $500 ticket, we called back and got the same story. The agent could not make changes but could make a request and then we could have the great pleasure of waiting (what, 3 to 4 days?) to see if we could make a change on a flight that is currently scheduled to depart in 3 days. Brilliant. And worthless. I can almost imagine getting an “escalated” email in 3 days saying that since our flight has just departed, there can be no change. Tough luck.

Our departing flight is with Delta Airlines. They have been wonderful to work with during this crisis, in spite of some mistakes, and have not charged fees for changes in our dates and departure locations. But Trip wants to charge us $300 for a change. Ouch. Sadly, because we booked with a 3rd party, calling Delta for help on this doesn’t work because they have to send us back to Trip. In the future, skip Trip for a better trip.

Your experience may be much better than ours, and all of this may be due to the pressures of the virus pandemic, but other companies are maintaining decent customer service, not this maddening cycle of delays and impotent agents.

 

 

By |2020-02-12T20:50:48-07:00February 10th, 2020|Categories: China, Consumers, Surviving, Travel tips|Tags: , , |0 Comments

Ctrip Trouble: Beware “Free Cancellation”

Ctrip.com is one of the most popular sites for booking travel in Asia and my experiences with it have generally been positive. Unfortunately, I learned that hotel rooms advertised with “free cancellation” policies may leave the purchaser without the protection sought. I also learned that Ctrip’s customer service needs serious improvement.

I was booking a room for 5 people for a tentative stay in Haikou, Hainan. Seeing that the Tienyow Hotel offered some rooms with free cancellation, I booked one of those rooms and then prepaid. The listing with free cancellation had a higher price than the same kind of room without free cancellation, but the extra price was worth the security of having free cancellation if our plans were to change.

On the payment page, the listing continued to show the words “free cancellation” (I didn’t pay much attention to that at the time, actually, but have since verified this behavior on similar listings at the hotel) — but also had a confusing message about not being able to make changes once an order is confirmed. I figured that was standard verbiage that had not been updated to reflect the free cancellation that I was paying for. After all, I was paying extra for the free cancellation service.

When I completed payment, I received an email from Ctrip that said I had paid and that everything was nonrefundable in case I wanted to change. So I called customer service and was told that there was no free cancellation and they couldn’t do anything about it. The representative didn’t seem to get that it was a pretty disturbing, actually illegal, thing to advertise a service or benefit (free cancellation), charge extra for it, and then withhold the service. I asked to speak to a supervisor. The supervisor was too busy, I was told, but would call me back. He or she did not.

I later went to Ctrip’s live chat and explained the problem and asked for the email of the Legal Department and the CEO so I could register my complaint. They refused to give me that information, after repeated requests, and simply said that “We would inform the staff.” Huh? It took a while to get them to explain what they meant by that, but it was that they would ask a customer service person to call me. Other than that, the chat rep would not answer anything, in spite of my other questions about how they could offer free cancellation and not provide it.

Finally I did get a call from a supervisor in customer service who wanted to argue and tell me that they “had clearly” given notice that there was no free cancellation because of the conflicting message on the second page. They could not change my order because this was their policy, and they cannot change their policy.

At this point a native-Chinese speaking lawyer in my office jumped in and argued with the rep. After about 30 minutes, they offered to try to cancel the reservation for me. But that failed because the hotel refused to cooperate. Later, however, Ctrip did kindly acknowledge that there was something of a problem here and offered to cover 50% of my loss if we have to change or cancel the reservation that I’ve paid for. They also offered 100 RMB, later upped to 200 RMB, as Ctrip-bucks if we do complete the reservation. OK, that’s an improvement, but it took a lot of time and energy to get Ctrip to budge, and they still have a credibility gap when it comes to their offerings. They claim they will fix that soon. I hope so.

By |2016-10-24T05:57:52-07:00October 20th, 2016|Categories: China, Consumers, Shopping, Surviving, Travel tips|Tags: , , , |Comments Off on Ctrip Trouble: Beware “Free Cancellation”